Being an Undergraduate Archaeologist in Tennessee

30 Days of Tennessee Archaeology, Day 6

Katherine Brown
University of Tennessee

The University of Tennessee Anthropology department is mostly known for one thing: Dr. William Bass’ Body Farm. (Students at the school don’t call it that, it’s known as the Anthropological Research Facility, or ARF.) I’ve known about it since I was a kid. I grew up in Middle Tennessee, in a college town in Putnam County. As soon as I showed an interested in history and anthropology, I was told about the Body Farm. Even now, when I tell people I am an anthropology major, I get asked if I work at the Body Farm. To be fair, I have and still do volunteer at ARF every semester I can. It’s amazing the work they do and the research I can be a part of as an undergraduate, even if I am scrubbing bones with a toothbrush! But I always want to explain that there are so many more things going on in the Anthropology department than just the research going on at ARF.

During my three years at UT, I’ve been very lucky to participate in some of this amazing research. I’m a junior anthropology student, and I’m fortunate enough to have worked in Dr. David Anderson’s prehistoric archaeology lab for the last year. When I first got to UT, I hadn’t realized there were any archaeological labs to work in, but once I stumbled into the lab I never looked back! I was working under the supervision of doctoral student Martin Walker on his doctoral thesis work. The project was over the Topper Site, located along the Savannah River in Allendale County, South Carolina. The site became famous in the early 2000s for having possible evidence for pre-Clovis occupation dating to around 50,000 years ago. While working in the lab, I had the chance to help with the doctoral research, and I was allowed to work independently and in groups with other lab technicians to help research our own projects using the Topper site. This wasn’t just something to add to my CV. I was able to meet other students who were like me and wanted to study archaeology. Up until that point, I hadn’t met anyone like that before! I was able to get involved in research and learn how it was done, which gave me a head start in deciding what my research will be in the (not so far) future. I was able to get involved in my school and in my department, with professors and students.

Dr. Anderson’s lab is not the only archaeology lab in the anthropology department. Dr. Barbara Heath runs the historical archaeology lab which works on the Coan Hall site in Northern Virginia. Students have the opportunity to use the collections at the McClung Museum on campus, and can volunteer there as well.  Every year, the Classic’s department at UT sends a group of students to Loukkos Valley in Morocco, the site of the ancient city of Lixus and one of the purported locations of the Gardens of the Hesperides. The possibilities to get involved are endless, all you have to do is dig a little!

Studying archaeology has been a dream of mine for as long as I can remember, and the Anthropology program at UT has helped me to achieve my dream. This year I was given the opportunity to participate in a five-week program through the Institute for Field Research in Turkey at the Neolithic site of Boncuklu. Without the help and support of the faculty and staff at UT, I would not have been as successful. Being a student in this program is something I am grateful for every day.

 

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365 Days of Tennessee Archaeology: 2016 and Beyond

Phillip Hodge
President, Tennessee Council for Professional Archaeology
Tennessee Department of Transportation

Well, that’s it, folks. Another “30 Days of Tennessee Archaeology” is in the books! I want to thank everyone who followed along each day and especially all those who contributed a post! Special appreciation is also due to Aaron Deter-Wolf, Jesse Tune, and Andrew Gillreath-Brown, who solicited contributions, organized the blogfest, and made it happen! Just this morning, Jesse and Aaron reported that we reached more than 50,000 people on Facebook, accumulating more than 3,000 reactions, comments, and shares, and had almost 11,000 visits to our website! The most viewed posts were Sarah Levithol’s on the skull discovered in Elliston Place near downtown Nashville, Sarah Sherwood’s on Rebel’s Rest in Sewanee, and Aaron Deter-Wolf’s on the archaeology of tattooing. As they do every year, these numbers underscore the success and popularity of the blogfest.

I continue to be impressed each year with the quality and diversity of archaeological research, outreach, and stewardship activities in Tennessee. If you’ll indulge me, I’d like to offer a few reflections on the posts this year as a way to wrap up the 2016 blogfest and let you know what TCPA has accomplished this year and where we’re heading in the upcoming year. Let me start with what is, by now, a cliché and entirely unoriginal observation to say that modern archaeology takes a village. That is, it takes specialists from many different fields of study to collect and interpret information about the past. It is also true that modern archaeology is now taking place in our villages. I was impressed this year by the number of surveys, excavations, or outreach projects that TCPA archaeologists are carrying out in the towns and communities where they live and work. Take for example, Ryan Parish of the University of Memphis and his Nonconnnah Creek survey in Shelby County, or Sarah Sherwood of the University of the South and her excavations at Rebel’s Rest in Sewanee, or Jared Barrett of TRC Environmental and his excavations of the Civil War era Cotton Gin in Franklin. Not only are these projects local, but they’re also projects that the communities in which they’re located are interested and invested.

Like most things today, archaeology is rapidly migrating to digital technologies and processes. Danny Gregory’s post on New South Associates smartphone based field recording system is an important development that blurs the line between field, lab, analysis, and reporting – steps in the archaeological research process that were once wholly distinct. Likewise, Paige Silcox and Aaron Deter- Wolf’s post on efforts at the Tennessee Division of Archaeology to digitize the state site files and incorporate them into a geographic information system will facilitate statewide analyses and reveal patterns and relationships in the state’s database that were not visible in an analog system. However, I would be remiss not to mention Tracy Brown’s post, which reminds us that no matter how advanced our technology, there will always be a place in archaeological research for local informants and good old fashioned gum-shoe archival research.

Journalists and others have described the opening decades of the 21 st century as the age of big data. I’ve often wondered what big data would look like in archaeology and I think David Anderson and his colleagues have provided an answer with the Digital Index of North American Archaeology. The DINAA database allows for the first time the continental (and theoretically, global) scale integration of spatial, cultural, and chronological data. The big picture questions DINAA will allow us to ask is hard to comprehend. If this is indeed the age of big data, then Sierra Bow and Stephen Carmody and colleagues posts on molecular analyses points to the power of “small data.” What’s most impressive, however, is that today we have the technology and theoretical openness to ask questions at both ends of this spectrum, from the global to the atomic, and everywhere in between.

Finally, as I read the posts each day I kept coming back to one question: are our observations about the past scalable to the present? That is, are our observations of the past scalable such that we can use them to address problems we face today and to inform our expectations of the future? And, by extension, contribute in a meaningful and practical way to policy discussions aimed confronting the challenges of a complex, ever changing world. To take one example, I thought Jesse Tune’s post on adaptation to late Pleistocene environmental change spoke to this dilemma. The New York Times recently ran a cover story about coastal inundation and the overwhelming challenges it presents to local governments. Late Pleistocene hunters and gatherers are admittedly a long ways from modern Americans in coastal Georgia, yet the fundamental human challenge both face is the same and is limited by the range of options and resources that structure their lives. Archaeology can contribute to this discussion by translating our long view of the past to a better understanding of social, economic, and environmental problems, and their consequences, in the present. This, in my view, is the grand challenge of archaeology here in Tennessee and around the world.

Before I sign off, I want share with you some of the initiatives TCPA has been working on this year. While the year got off to a frozen start, with a record snowstorm and cancellation of the Current Research in Tennessee Archaeology (CRITA) meeting, the Board and officers held virtual meetings and discussions online throughout the year and have racked up a number of important accomplishments. We awarded our annual research grant in the spring, coordinated with the National Park Service, MTSU, and the Tennessee Historical Commission throughout the summer on the Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Month poster, and organized and hosted 30 Days of Tennessee Archaeology this fall. We’re also monitoring several important federal legislative efforts related to archaeological sites and artifacts and are currently preparing comments on the prehistoric module in the state’s social studies standards.

Perhaps our most important accomplishment this year is sponsoring “Secrets of the Nolichucky,” which is a documentary on the Cane Notch site near Johnson City. Jay Franklin and his colleagues at East Tennessee State University carried out excavations there this past winter. I had the opportunity to visit Jay’s lab earlier this year and see some of the Cane Notch material first hand – it is nothing short of amazing. The documentary will air on East Tennessee Public Television late this year or early 2017. You can see the trailer here (also embedded below).

If you like what you’ve heard and read about this month, you can help TCPA continue this work and expand our outreach efforts by joining or renewing your membership today. Starting today and running through International Archaeology Day on October 15, you can join TCPA or renew your existing membership for $15, which is a 25% discount off of the regular membership rate. Just go to the membership page on the TCPA website and click on the link for “Discounted Full Membership.” If you join or renew before October 15, your membership will cover the remainder of 2016 and remain in effect through December 2017. I just took advantage of this offer myself! I hope you’ll join me and help TCPA fulfill its mission to support professional archaeology in Tennessee.

On behalf of TCPA’s board, officers, and membership, thank you again for following along through 30 Days of Tennessee Archaeology! I also want to take this opportunity to thank all of the professional archaeologist in the state, including your students, employees, and volunteers, who put TCPA’s mission into practice and advocate for professionalism in archaeology in the best way possible –through your actions. This year has been an unqualified success for TCPA and we look forward to an equally successful year in 2017. See you at CRITA!

Research Awards Announcement, Spring 2015

The Tennessee Council for Professional Archaeology is pleased to announce the call for proposals for our annual Research Awards Program! This program of small grants is intended to support archaeological investigations and research in Tennessee, and is open to all students, researchers, and cultural resource management professionals conducting archaeological investigations within the state and who are TCPA members in good standing. Awards do not generally exceed $600, and are intended to supplement a current or proposed research project.  Recipients are selected though a competitive application process. A list of previous Research Award recipients can be found here. Proposal applications for spring, 2015 will be accepted until April 10. Applications will be reviewed and decisions announced by a target deadline of May 8. 

For detailed information on the awards and application process, please consult the Research Awards section of our web site.

Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Month Legislation!

Following the success of Tennessee’s State Artifact legislation and re-launch of Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Month celebrations in 2014, the Tennessee Council for Professional Archaeology was keen to preserve legislative momentum and further promote the unique archaeological heritage of our state going into 2015. At the January 2015 annual Business Meeting, TCPA Executive Board member and head of the Legislative Committee Jared Barrett proposed that TCPA contact lawmakers and promote new legislation codifying September as Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Month. The membership voted and agreed TCPA should move forward with this initiative.

Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Month grew out of Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Week, which beginning in 1996 took place in September in order to incorporate the Archaeofest event at Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Park. Over the years Archaeological Awareness celebrations have included the efforts of numerous professional and avocational archaeologists, and reached thousands of citizens. However, there has been no official legislative recognition of the event.

In addition to the traditional Archaeological Awareness celebration, two other factors led the Executive Board to identify September for the Archaeology Awareness Month legislation. In 2013 and 2014, September was named “American Indian Heritage Month.” This fits nicely with the archaeological celebration and acknowledgement of centuries of Native American contributions to Tennessee history. Secondly, in July of 2013 the State of Tennessee Board of Education approved new statewide Social Studies standards. The first unit for 4th grade Social Studies under the new standards is “The Land and People before European Exploration,” in which students learn to “Describe the legacy and cultures of the major indigenous settlements in Tennessee,” beginning with the first PaleoAmerican settlers and extending through historic Native American tribes. This unit is covered at the beginning of the school year, extending into September.

Jared approached Senator Bill Ketron of Murfreesboro (District 13), who agreed to sponsor the Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Month bill. Ketron enlisted the support of Representative Steve McDaniel of Parkers Crossroads (District 72). Together they introduced SB0170/HB0313, which reads: “Naming and Designating – As introduced, designates the month of September as ‘Tennessee Archaeology Awareness Month’ to encourage citizens to learn more about prehistoric and historic archaeology in Tennessee.” This legislation amends TCA Title 4, Chapter 1, Part 4, the portion of the Tennessee Code that also designates statewide celebrations including Tennessee Genealogy Month and Women in STEM Month.

The Archaeology Awareness Month bill has now been introduced to both the Tennessee House and Senate. You can track the progress of the bill online at the General Assembly Bill Search page.

Online Research and Digital Collections

Ceramic vessel from Iran, Chalcolithic period (5000 - 3500 B.C.E.). Freer Gallery of Art accession number S1998.184.

Ceramic vessel from Chalcolithic period Iran, 5000 – 3500 B.C.E. (Freer Gallery of Art accession number S1998.184).

The New Year has already brought some big news from the world of museums and archaeology. On January 1, 2015 the Smithsonian quietly released a digital collection of some 40,000 artworks from the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. The image database includes fantastic pieces of ancient art from Egypt, the Near East, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, as well as a collection of American works from 1855–1919.

Museums and universities throughout the world have been gradually digitizing their collections for years, and many of these image libraries can now be accessed through online searches (for example, see The British Museum, the Louvre, the Canadian Museum of History, and Wake Forest University’s Museum of Anthropology).  What makes the release of Freer and Sackler materials by the Smithsonian so remarkable is that it is the first time (we’re aware of) that an entire collection has been made available in high-resolution for free for non-commercial use. According to the Washington Post, the Smithsonian eventually plans to host 360-degree renderings of materials from their collection.

Here in Tennessee, the University of Tennessee Libraries and McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture were early adopters of the digital collections model. Beginning in 2002 with the assistance of a grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services, they digitized an extensive archive of photographs from WPA archaeological excavations conducted prior to TVA dam construction in the 1930s.

Mississippian effigy hooded water bottle from Monroe County, Tennessee (National Museum of American History catalog # A115559-0)

Mississippian effigy hooded water bottle from Monroe County, Tennessee (National Museum of American History catalog # A115559-0)

There are also several collections of archaeological materials from Tennessee that are curated out of state but searchable via online databases. The collections database of the National Museum of Natural History contains some 203,000 digital images from their Archaeology, Ethnology and Physical Anthropology Collections. These include at least 121 items originating in Tennessee. The National Museum of the American Indian also provides images of items from Tennessee including those from the collections of Joseph Jones and William E. Meyer. Finally, a search of the online collections of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard returns 4,600 results for items from Tennessee, although only some records have accompanying images.

In addition to images of artifacts, researchers who do not have privileges at university libraries now enjoy unprecedented access to ethnographies, historic documents, and primary source materials via the internet. Research gateways of course include Google Books and Archive.org, but also sites such as the Tennessee Virtual Archive, the Smithsonian’s Biodiversity Library and Contributions to Anthropology, UNC’s Documenting the American South project, American Journeys from the Wisconsin Historical Society, the American Memory project at the Library of Congress, the Combined Arms Research Library, and the Digital Public Library of America. Thanks to the internet and the good work of museums and libraries we’re now living in a golden age of collections research. Happy 2015!

2014 Gift Guide for Archaeologists

GIFTS FOR YOUR ARCHAEOLOGIST

It’s kind of last minute, but that’s also the way we write our conference papers.

This time of year there are a slew of online gift guides. Do you need inspiration for what to give your favorite geekcat lover, Twitter dad, Game of Thrones enthusiast, or Taylor Swift fan? The internet has you covered. But what about for the archaeologist or archaeology-enthusiast? So far this year we’ve only found one archaeology gift guide, via DigVentures.

We at the Tennessee Council for Professional Archaeology are here to help, and have put together a list of gift ideas for the archaeologist in your life. Just think of us as Santa’s little field techs. We’ve also set up a Pinterest board to curate our picks in one easy to access location.


Show me gifts for:

The Archaeology Student

The Field Archaeologist

The Academic Archaeologist

Archaeologists with Kids

Aspiring Junior Archaeologists

Archaeology Enthusiasts


For the Archaeology Student:

Archaeology notebook. Sure, it’s technically a fieldbook, but how can you resist taking class notes in this appropriately labeled, acid-free field book from Forestry suppliers.

Archaeology notebook. It’s technically a fieldbook, but how can you resist taking class notes in this appropriately labeled, acid-free book from Forestry suppliers.

Guide for estimating vessel diameters - a perfect addition to the student lab notebook

Guide for estimating vessel diameters – a perfect addition to the student lab notebook.

Ethical Issues in Archaeology by Larry J. Zimmerman - because ethics shouldn’t be limited to a one-time lecture in an intro class

Ethical Issues in Archaeology by Larry J. Zimmerman – because ethics shouldn’t be limited to a one-time lecture in an intro class.

Is your student getting ready to take their first field school? Then consider giving them their first trowel. People have very individualized taste in trowels, but they won’t go wrong with a Marshalltown Premier Line 45-5 (5") pointing trowel with wooden handle.

Is your student getting ready to take their first field school? Then consider giving them their first trowel. People have very individualized taste in trowels, but they won’t go wrong with a Marshalltown Premier Line 45-5 (5″) pointing trowel with wooden handle.

Memberships to their favorite professional organizations (SAA, AIA, SHA, AAA, regional conferences, etc.)

Memberships to their favorite professional organizations (SAA, AIA, SHA, AAA, regional conferences, the TCPA, etc.)

All students need a reminder that they will live through finals, Keep Calm and Major in Anthropology gear

Keep Calm and Major in Anthropology gear, because all students need a reminder that they have lived through finals.

Take me back to the top!


For the Field Archaeologist:

Pocket loop for on-the-go magnification of pottery temper, bone cut marks, and splinter removal

Pocket loop, for on-the-go magnification of pottery temper, bone cut marks, and splinter removal.

Pocket scale. These handy credit card-sized scales fit in your wallet or lanyard for easy access in the field.

Pocket scale. These handy credit card-sized scales fit in your wallet or lanyard for easy access in the field.

Tecnu- the perfect stocking stuffer for the poison-ivy prone on your list

Tecnu– the perfect stocking stuffer for the poison-ivy prone on your list.

Fiberglass folding ruler in metric and english – won’t break when rapidly folding in advance of an approaching storm, waterproof, and can be used on prehistoric and historic sites.

Fiberglass folding ruler in metric and english – won’t break when rapidly folding in advance of an approaching storm, waterproof, and can be used on prehistoric and historic sites.

A multi-tool, like this Leatherman Wave, is a handy addition to the field pack. The versatility of a tool box without the weight and bulk.

A multi-tool, like this Leatherman Wave, is a handy addition to the field pack. The versatility of a tool box without the weight and bulk.

Speaking of multi-tools, here's an ink pen that's also a bubble level, screwdriver and scale?

Speaking of multi-tools, here’s a pencil that’s also a stylus, bubble level, screwdriver and scale!

Day pack for survey work. We prefer front or panel-loading for ease of access, and a decent outer bungee system is a plus.  *Note: Military style packs offer some great options so far as outer pockets and load-capacity, but AVOID military camouflage patterns for both work gear and clothes. It is unwise to wear such attire in some locales/countries for fear or being mistaken for militia, military, etc.

Day pack for survey work. We prefer front or panel-loading for ease of access, and a decent outer bungee system is a plus. *Note: Military style packs offer some great options so far as outer pockets and load-capacity, but AVOID military camouflage patterns for both work gear and clothes. It is unwise to wear such attire in some locales/countries for fear or being mistaken for militia, military, etc.

Durable water bottles! There are all sorts on the market, but you can’t go wrong with the classic 32 oz. narrow-mouth loop top by Nalgene. It can be filled halfway and frozen overnight, it won’t shatter when dropped or thrown, it doesn’t heat up in the all-day sun, and the loop top keeps the lid in easy reach (plus you can hook a carabiner to it).

Durable water bottles! There are all sorts on the market, but you can’t go wrong with the classic 32 oz. narrow-mouth loop top by Nalgene. It can be filled halfway and frozen overnight, it won’t shatter when dropped or thrown, it doesn’t heat up in the all-day sun, and the loop top keeps the lid in easy reach (plus you can hook a carabiner to it).

Waterproof medical kit, because when you’re out on a transect it can be a long way back to the car.

Waterproof medical kit, because when you’re out on a transect it can be a long way back to the car.

The Theodolite app combines a compass, GPS, map, photo/movie camera, and rangefinder into a single app on your i-device, and is a fantastic tool for collecting data while on survey.

The Theodolite app combines a compass, GPS, map, photo/movie camera, and rangefinder into a single app on your i-device, and is a fantastic tool for collecting data while on survey.

Kneeling pad – the knees are the first to go on an archaeologist’s body (closely followed by the back). Why not prolong their use-life?

Kneeling pad – the knees are the first to go on an archaeologist’s body (closely followed by the back). Why not prolong their use-life?

Hand and boot warmers – no explanation necessary.

Hand and boot warmers – no explanation necessary.

Take me back to the top!


For the Academic Archaeologist:

Field Notes notebooks. Sure, they’re not the gold standard all-weather Rite-in-the-Rain, but there’s something about the simple, retro design of these notebooks that we love. Check out the color palette of the slightly more expensive “Ambition” series.

Field Notes notebooks. They’re not as well suited to fieldwork as the all-weather Rite-in-the-Rain books, but there’s something about the simple, retro design of these that we love. Check out the color palette of the slightly more expensive “Ambition” series.

A bowtie from Otis James Nashville. Because bowties are cool.

A bow tie from Otis James Nashville. Because bow ties are cool.

Chalkboard skulls make fantastic conversation pieces for the corner of an office desk.

Chalkboard skulls make fantastic conversation pieces for the corner of an office desk.

Pottery with designs inspired by the Guale of the Georgia Coast and St. Catherine’s Island.

Pottery with designs inspired by the Guale of the Georgia Coast and St. Catherine’s Island.

Scarves! Scarves are a unisex gift item. This important fashion accessory does triple duty: it dresses up an otherwise non-descript outfit, the right fabric can actually keep your neck warm, and well, wear what you study! Scarves can be worn to teach a seminar, dash across campus between meetings, and to signify research expertise while attending a professional conference. If the scarf is made of organic materials, fairtrade, and a percentage of the sale price goes to helping women in developing countries feed their families – all the better. See the Pinterest board for some that we like.

Scarves! Scarves are a unisex gift item. This fashion accessory does triple duty: it dresses up an otherwise non-descript outfit, the right fabric can actually keep your neck warm, you can wear what you study! Scarves can be worn to teach a seminar, dash across campus between meetings, and to signify research expertise while attending a professional conference. If the scarf is made of organic materials, fairtrade, and a percentage of the sale price goes to helping women in developing countries feed their families – all the better. See the Pinterest board for some that we like.

Take me back to the top!


For the Archaeologist with Kids:

Archaeology for Kids – get the kids outside and participating in archaeology activities in their own backyards!

Archaeology for Kids – get the kids outside and participating in archaeology activities in their own backyards!

What kid doesn’t love extinct mega-fauna? Replicas of wooly mammoth and mastodon teeth make a great stocking stuffer.

What kid doesn’t love extinct mega-fauna? Replicas of wooly mammoth and mastodon teeth make a great stocking stuffer.

Carcassonne Hunters and Gatherers  – set in the Stone Age, players build the landscape, subsist off the land, and form a civilization.

Carcassonne Hunters and Gatherers – set in the Stone Age, players build the landscape, subsist off the land, and form a civilization.

True Temper kids shovel - because DIRT!

True Temper kids shovel – because DIRT!

Take me back to the top!


For the Aspiring Junior Archaeologist:

Archaeologists Dig for Clues! by Kate Duke. Stage 2 reader, ages 4-8.

Archaeologists Dig for Clues! by Kate Duke. Stage 2 reader, ages 4-8.

With all of the recent press about Stonehenge, why not give the aspiring archaeologist in your life a landscape print of this World Heritage Site?

With all of the recent press about Stonehenge, why not give the aspiring archaeologist in your life a landscape print of this World Heritage Site?

The Young Oxford Book of Archaeology, by Norah Moloney, recommended for grades 7 and up.

The Young Oxford Book of Archaeology, by Norah Moloney, recommended for grades 7 and up.

A great archaeology simulation kit that can be worked on with friends, available from Colonial Williamsburg

A great archaeology simulation kit that can be worked on with friends, available from Colonial Williamsburg.

Take me back to the top!


For the Archaeology Enthusiast:

Membership in the Archaeological Conservancy. It’s a great organization dedicated to preserving archaeological sites, and with membership they’ll get the publicly-accessible magazine American Archaeology.

Membership in the Archaeological Conservancy. It’s a great organization dedicated to preserving archaeological sites, and with membership they’ll receive the publicly-accessible magazine American Archaeology.

Looting Spiro Mounds by David La Vere. The true story of the destruction of one of America's archaeological treasures.

Looting Spiro Mounds by David La Vere. The true story of the destruction of one of America’s archaeological treasures.

Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble by Marilyn Johnson. "Archaeology is all around us, wherever humans once lived and wherever ground is turned, but actual archaeologists are elusive creatures, hard to spot in civilization and even harder to pin down in the wild."

Lives in Ruins: Archaeologists and the Seductive Lure of Human Rubble by Marilyn Johnson. “Archaeology is all around us, wherever humans once lived and wherever ground is turned, but actual archaeologists are elusive creatures, hard to spot in civilization and even harder to pin down in the wild.”

A History of the World in 100 Objects, by Neil MacGregor. This book comes out of a fantastic British Museum exhibition and BBC radio series.

A History of the World in 100 Objects, by Neil MacGregor. This book comes out of a fantastic British Museum exhibition and BBC radio series.

Archaeology Parks of the Upper Midwest by Deborah Morse-Kahn. A fantastic guide to Eighty-five dedicated archaeology parks exist in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and northern Illinois

A Guide to the Archaeology Parks of the Upper Midwest by Deborah Morse-Kahn. A fantastic guide to Eighty-five dedicated archaeology parks exist in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and northern Illinois

Take me back to the top!

Research Award Winners

The TCPA is pleased to announce that Timothy de Smet and Jessica Dalton-Carriger are the recipients of the spring, 2014 TCPA Research Award! Tim, a PhD student at Texas A&M, was awarded a grant to fund magnetometry, electromagnetic-induction, and ground-penetrating radar surveys at the multi-component Magnolia Valley site in Rutherford County. Jessica is a PhD candidate at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and will use her award to fund elemental analysis of glass trade beads from sites in East Tennessee using Laser Ablation Inductivity Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Congratulations to both the recipients!